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Take Notice! A Play About Teenagers With No Mention of the F-Word (Facebook)

Take Notice! A Play About Teenagers With No Mention of the F-Word (Facebook)

Recently I was in a meeting where someone was talking about “Millennials” and said the following: “With teenagers today, if they don’t share it on Facebook, it didn’t happen.” I thought to myself, if they really believe this and inadvertently forget to bring a camera to their child’s birthday party, they could be paying for that party twice. I also prayed this person was not responsible for any major decisions regarding deforestation.  Fast forward to the weekend for a different take on teenagers in the play Notice Me, an account of four teenagers living in California and dealing with steroids, virginity, kidnapping and trying out for the “Real World,” all within 48 hours. The play — written by Blair Singer and produced by a completely twentysomething cast — meant to tell a story about how young people seek out affirmation and will do so at any cost, whether it means increasing their physical presence, losing their “V” card on the hood of a car, stealing a baby or being recorded on TiVos across America.   But what Notice Me meant to “say” about youth culture was less interesting than what it actually accomplished — a portrait of how dissimilar four teenagers can be, and not from adults, but from each other. In this story, each character had different ambitions, identities and ideas about what it meant to be noticed — none of which included Facebook uploads! An interesting point to think about as we craft generalizations that paint every teenager as a texting maniac who only looks up in order to be “noticed” by the person on the other side of their ChatRoulette conversation.Go see it! For more culture picks check out this week’s Culturalist.

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The Culturalist

Our CulturaLUST of the week is Jonah Hill for being able to pull off two comedic rolls this weekend — one on the lighter side in  Get Him to the Greek as Russell Brand’s well-meaning sidekick the other on the darker side in Cyrus as a jealous son weary of his mother’s suitor. We hope he’s laughing all the way to the box office at haters that thought he was a one-trick pony. Our CulturalBUST of the week is the overexposure of Megan Fox – talent, check, beauty, check, sense of humor, check — so why can we only talk about her hot factor? Come on, people, if we only want to talk about pure hotness, we have a fresh season of True Blood ahead of us. For more cultural picks, check out last week’s issue of the Culturalist.

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Bustin Jieber and Musing on Our Teen Influencer Study With myYearbook

Teen culture moves faster than you can say “Why would Chase Crawford pull out of the remake of Footloose?”. One day we read that they aren’t interested in Twitter, and the next month they’re making “Bustin Jieber” a trending topic to mess with the social media site’s new algorithm where sustained chatter on a given item doesn’t register as a trending topic anymore. One-third of the time, it makes my head spin, another third makes me feel old, and the last third just makes me more curious. So in a (humble) attempt to better understand the teen scene, Ketchum partnered with myYearbook to survey 10,000 13-19-year-olds on what type of content interests them most, what they think of being friends with their parents on Facebook and if they are in to Foursquare after all. Below are some highlights from Alissa Walker’s post about the study on Fast Company. For the full piece go here.  Don’t friend them (until they’re 18)56% of teens 13-14 years old were wary of their parents friending them on social networks, but by the time they were 18, only 27% cared. Friends are friendsTeens who are more social online are more social offline. No more envisioning the ultraconnected teen sitting home to iChat on a Saturday night. The more friends teens have online, the more likely they are to socialize and go to parties in real life. No check-ins, pleaseThe survey confirms something we’ve been hearing for some time: Teens don’t like location-based apps. Only 16% of influencers report using a mobile application like Foursquare or Gowalla.

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