Tag Archives | crisis management

Reputation Management: A Blueprint for 2017

2017, a year of significant change in many parts of the world for sure. What will it hold for organizations in the area of reputation management? A new year always brings new challenges in an ever-evolving reputational threat landscape. But it also inevitably includes imperatives which are seemingly timeless and risks we can anticipate year after year.

With that in mind, here are seven observations, potential watch-outs and recommendations for brands and organizations as we begin the year:

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The Role of Social Media in Crisis Situations

Social media has changed absolutely everything and absolutely nothing in crisis communications.

I’m on my way to the International Air Transport Association’s Crisis Communications Conference in Hong Kong today and much of the discussion leading up to the event has focused on the impact of social media in crisis situations, and for good reason. Social media has been a transformative catalyst in both responding to and managing crises, creating both considerable challenges and very real opportunities for communicators across all industry sectors.

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Memo to Herman: The Rules of Engagement Have Changed!

To say it’s been a difficult two weeks for Republican presidential hopeful Herman Cain would be a gross understatement.

We haven’t seen a presidential primary media scrum like this since Bill Clinton in 1992 and Gary Hart in 1988 – long before social media, Twitter, or even cable news channels, for that matter.

The rules of engagement have changed completely, though Cain seems to have missed the memo.

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Tragedy in Japan: Addressing Natural Disasters

Tragedy in Japan: Addressing Natural Disasters

The situation in northeast Japan is grim and may soon get worse. At the time of this writing, the earthquake and resulting tsunami has led to early estimates between 900 and 1,800 dead. That does not include the nearly 9,500 people unaccounted for in the coastal town Minamisanriku. Japanese authorities are also presuming that two nuclear reactor meltdowns may already be underway. Broadcast media have already speculated on the possibility of another Chernobyl-like disaster.The people of Japan will need help. If history is a guide, help will come. It will come from the U.S. and other governments. It will come from citizen donations that will funnel through charitable, religious and disaster-aid organizations. It will also come from emergency management and corporate-citizen efforts of many companies that have the resources to pitch in.

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The Changing Crisis Management Landscape

Reputation is undoubtedly one of a corporation’s most valuable assets. Organizations invest millions of dollars and many years of effort to build their brands and develop trust among their stakeholders. But in today’s lightning-fast, hyper-connected world, a crisis can occur in a heartbeat and destroy a hard-earned reputation at Internet speed. With so much at stake, effective crisis communication and issues management require companies to gain a new understanding of who their audiences are and what they expect and share about a brand. In a new podcast I just recorded for an audio series by American Airlines called “The Executive Report,” I discuss how new demands for corporate transparency and new channels opened by social media are transformng the way companies must prepare for and respond to crises. I invite you to listen to this discussion below and let me know your thoughts on this topic.  http://newsroom.ketchum.com/multimedia-center/podcasts/changing-crisis-management-landscape

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Tips to Mitigate and Respond to Workplace Violence

Tips to Mitigate and Respond to Workplace Violence

When workplace violence hits your company or community, statistics do not matter. The community of Manchester, Connecticut, and employees of Hartford Distributors probably know that all too well after yesterday’s tragedy.  For the rest of us who follow these situations and wonder if lessons are evident, the statistics provide some context. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, workplace homicides have fallen 52% between 1994 to 2008. Yet, nearly 2 million U.S. workers still fall victim to workplace assaults. And 70% of U.S. workplaces do not have a formal program or policy in place to address the problem. (See page 14: http://www.bls.gov/iif/oshwc/osch0033.pdf). Thus, while most experts concede that workplace violence cannot always be prevented, there is clear room for improvement from the private sector. 

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